Trees and farmers, no problem!

For farmers planting trees certainly has advantages. The roots increase soil drainage and our trees can fix nitrogen and therefore enrich the soil. But for farmers there are usually problems associated with trees. First is that trees take a few years to start producing, usually around 3 to 5 years. For most farmers this is too long because in that time they have no income. So, farmers opt for faster growing crops. Another common problem is that planting trees requires a substantial investment. After the planting the trees need more care and time to nurse than annually producing crops. Finally, trees can also be tricky to manage together with others crops because they take up space and sunlight. This means that normal crops cannot grow properly.

Problems solved
So, trees are expensive and time-consuming for farmers but with us at Quadriz the famers have none of these problems! They don’t need to invest, we take care of that, as well as planting and maintenance. The farmer doesn’t use land with new trees for just a year, then our trees are resilient against livestock, and in return we pay for missed income. Because our trees improve the soil, more grass will grow, and the farmer will be able to increase the amount of livestock per hectare. Furthermore, after 25 years the farmers will own the trees on their land and everything the trees produce.

Another benefit is legal. Farmers in the Paraguayan Chaco, where we plant our trees, are required by law to keep a ‘green reserve’ of existing vegetation on 50% of their land. If they choose to let Quadriz plant trees on the areas of cattle land, they are actively reforesting and pay 50% less property tax. All these different benefits mean that we got farmers lined up to get our trees on their land.

For more info on trees and agriculture:

https://medium.com/environmental-intelligence/bring-back-the-trees-on-agricultural-fields-a064aead239

 

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